26
December
2003

Post Resurrected

Okay, we’ll see how much I can remember.

I didn’t quite finish my own ornament. I sewed up the back and worked the beaded hanger, but when I got to the fringe, I discovered that I was out of red beads! It’s on my tree as-is and I hope I’ll find the beads this weekend. As for other projects in the works, I spent most of yesterday watching movies and working on my sweater.

My sister loved the duster sweater I made her*. The whole family gushed about it. And my other sister felt a little jealous that she didn’t get one, too. But I’d already picked out a pattern I think she’ll like, so all I have to do is find yarn I like and I can probably have it ready for her birthday in March. *The only downside to the sweater was that it doesn’t have buttons or a sash, so there is nothing to keep it closed. K. expressed a desire for something like that and so I told her I’d pick up one more ball of the yarn and make one. Should be a tiny project.

As usual, when my family sees my handiwork, they suggest that I make more to sell. But I don’t want to and that always makes me feel like a snob. I’ve done the cost/profit analysis and I know I couldn’t sell them for enough to make a profit. I have a different career (I’m a computer scientist) and I went through a lot of schooling to get where I am and I don’t need to sell my projects to make money to feed my habit. And I already have plenty of projects that I want to do (like my new list above?), that I’d probably resent the time spent on the ones I’m doing to sell (not to mention all the effort in establishing a marketplace, etc). There have been a few projects that I’ve done for hire and they just weren’t as fun. Maybe it’s because I didn’t get to pick the project and I don’t know the people who will be receiving them and so I can’t imagine what their reaction to the gift will be so it removes that bit of anticipation. Anyway, I know I should take the “you should sell these!” comments as sincere flattery, but they always leave me with a bitter feeling. Maybe it’s just that my mother is very talented with a variety of crafts and yet, her attempts at turning it into a career never seem to go anywhere (more from lack of effort on her part than lack of customer interest), so why would she want to foist that on me?! Maybe I just resent the implication that I should have a more artsy feminine career.

I don’t want to give the impression that I don’t have any respect for artisans. I do. Without people who devote their lives to various arts and crafts, the world would be dreary and drab. And there would be no one to design the wonderful patterns that I do my best to follow, run the fantastic yarn/fabric/needle stores that I patronize, share their knowledge by teaching classes, or create the books and magazines filled with new ideas and techniques. I just think it’s a little insensitive for people to suggest that because you can do something well, you should sell it to the world.

26
December
2003

Do’h!